TODAY! Complexity in the Universe (speakers: Dr. Tom Chang and Mr. Ryan McKinnon, MIT)

Date: 
Friday, January 13,
1:30pm to 2:30pm
Location: 
Marlar Lounge 37-252

Complexity in the Universe

Complexity and Multifractals in Space and the Universe

Dr. Tom Chang

Abstract: This talk comprises a series of descriptive narratives geared toward the general audience. "Dynamical complexity" is a phenomenon observed in interacting many-body systems within which multitudes of different sizes of large scale coherent structures emerge, resulting in stochastic behaviors vastly different from those that could be surmised from the underlying equations of interactions. Everywhere one peers into space and the cosmos, there is complexity with the appearance of intermittent fluctuating events involving the mixing and distribution of correlated structures at all spatial and temporal scales. We shall briefly discuss techniques describing intermittency based on the concept of multifractals -- i.e., multitudes of structures involving non-integer dimensions, and provide several interesting examples with colorful graphics. Theories that explain the onsets and evolutions of the multifractals are then qualitatively described. In particular, one such method, CILOMAS (complexity induced Lifshitz ordering with multifractal antiscreening and screening), can yield interesting probable answers to the perplexing mysteries involving dark matters in gravitational evolution at cosmological scales.

 

Simulating the Universe on a Supercomputer

Mr. Ryan McKinnon

Abstract: Galaxies in the universe form and grow over time in a complicated nonlinear fashion. Recent advances in supercomputing ability make it possible to numerically model the essential physics and evolve a "mock" universe from shortly after the Big Bang to the present day, producing a fairly realistic population of galaxies. In this talk, I will highlight the key topics in physics that govern galaxy formation, display visualizations from state-of-the-art astrophysics simulations, and discuss the supercomputing resources needed to simulate the universe.


No enrollment limit for these talks, no advance sign-up required.

 

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