Max Tegmark's SDSS page - download power spectra, windows etc. here

Together with my fellow members of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) large-scale structure working group, I've had lots of fun thinking about ways to test, validate and analyze galaxy clustering data since 1996. I'll keep updating this page with publications and downloadable data products that I've worked on as they become available.

Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies

This packages up the large-scale clustering information from the SDSS LRGs as a useful starting point for cosmological model fitting. These SDSS luminous red galaxies are a great cosmological probe, providing much smaller error bars on large scales than any other currently available galaxy sample, including the main sample galaxies discussed further down on this page.
Figure 22: Measured power spectra for the LRG and main galaxy samples. The solid curves correspond to the linear theory LCDM fits to WMAP3 alone normalized to galaxy bias b=1.9 (top) and b=1.1 (bottom) relative to the z=0 matter power. The dashed curves include the nonlinear correction of Cole et al (2005) for A=1.4, with Q=30 for the LRGs and Q=4.6 for the main galaxies. The onset of nonlinear corrections is clearly visible for k>0.09 h/Mpc (vertical line).

Click here to download a PDF version of the paper. The measurements and their window functions are further down on this page.

Downloadable P(k) data and software

  1. Monte Carlo Markov Chains: here. The 15 columns in each file contain (step, exp(-2*tau), Theta_s, Omega_Lambda, omega_d, omega_b, omega_nu, n_s, 1+n_t, A_s, r, b, w, Q_nl, lnL) as defined by Table 2 of astro-ph/0608632. Files mentioning "lrg" are WMAP+LRG, the rest are WMAP-only. If you'd like me to post additional chains, or ones including all the dependent parameters in Table 2, please let me know.
  2. Measurements and error bars from Table 1 in the paper: sdss_lrg_measurements.txt
  3. Window functions: sdss_lrg_windows.txt
  4. k-bands at which window functions are defined: sdss_lrg_kbands.txt
  5. Sample f77 code that computes SDSS LRG likelihood given some P(k) model: compute_lrg_likelihood.f, lrg_likelihood_common.f
  6. All of the above combined into a single gzipped tar file: lrg_likelihood_code.tar.gz
This code is described in Appendix A.4 of the paper. If you're a CosmoMC user, you'll be pleased to know that the guts of this code have already been converted to a CosmoMC plugin by Anthony Lewis, Hiranya Peiris and Licia Verde, and is available here.

Slides for a talk?

Here's a tarball with ps and gif images of all the figures in the LRG+WMAP3 paper. If you type "xv *.gif" after unpacking it, hitting "[TAB]" will overlay the constraints one by one. Here's the same plots in in the powerpoint.

Authors:

Max Tegmark, Daniel Eisenstein, Michael Strauss, David Weinberg, Michael Blanton, Joshua Frieman, Masataka Fukugita, James Gunn, Andrew Hamilton, Gillian Knapp, Robert Nichol, Jeremiah Ostriker, Nikhil Padmanabhan, Will Percival, David Schlegel, Donald Schneider, Roman Scoccimarro, Uros Seljak, Hee-Jong Seo, Molly Swanson, Alexander Szalay, Michael Vogeley, Jaiyul Yoo, Idit Zehavi, Kevork Abazajian, Scott Anderson, James Annis, Neta Bahcall, Bruce Bassett, Andreas Berlind, Jon Brinkmann, Tamas Budavari, Francisco Castander, Andrew Connolly, Istvan Csabai, Mamoru Doi, Douglas Finkbeiner, Bruce Gillespie, Karl Glazebrook, Gregory Hennessy, David Hogg, Zeljko Ivezic, Bhuvnesh Jain, David Johnston, Stephen Kent, Donald Lamb, Brian Lee, Huan Lin, Jon Loveday, Robert Lupton, Jeffrey Munn, Kaike Pan, Changbom Park, John Peoples, Jeffrey Pier, Adrian Pope, Michael Richmond, Constance Rockosi, Ryan Scranton, Ravi Sheth, Albert Stebbins, Christopher Stoughton, Istvan Szapudi, Douglas Tucker, Daniel Vanden Berk, Brian Yanny, Donald York

Abstract:

We measure the large-scale real-space power spectrum P(k) using luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and use this measurement to sharpen constraints on cosmological parameters from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We employ a matrix-based power spectrum estimation method using Pseudo-Karhunen-Loeve eigenmodes, producing uncorrelated minimum-variance measurements in 20 k-bands of both the clustering power and its anisotropy due to redshift-space distortions, with narrow and well-behaved window functions in the range 0.01h/Mpc < k < 0.2h/Mpc. Results from the LRG and main galaxy samples are consistent, with the former providing higher signal-to-noise. Our results are robust to omitting angular and radial density fluctuations and are consistent between different parts of the sky. They provide a striking confirmation of the predicted large-scale LCDM power spectrum.

Combining only SDSS LRG and WMAP data places robust constraints on many cosmological parameters that complement prior analyses of multiple data sets. The LRGs provide independent cross-checks on Omega_m and the baryon fraction in good agreement with WMAP. Within the context of flat LCDM models, our LRG measurements complement WMAP by sharpening the constraints on the matter density, the neutrino density and the tensor amplitude by about a factor of two, giving Omega_m=0.24+-0.02 (1 sigma), sum m_nu < 0.9 eV (95%) and r<0.3 (95%). Baryon oscillations are clearly detected and provide a robust measurement of the comoving distance to the median survey redshift z=0.35 independent of curvature and dark energy properties. Within the LCDM framework, our power spectrum measurement improves the evidence for spatial flatness, sharpening the curvature constraint Omega_tot=1.05+-0.05 from WMAP alone to Omega_tot=1.003+-0.010. Assuming Omega_tot=1, the equation of state parameter is constrained to w=-0.94+-0.09, indicating the potential for more ambitious future LRG measurements to provide precision tests of the nature of dark energy. All these constraints are essentially independent of scales k>0.1h/Mpc and associated nonlinear complications, yet agree well with more aggressive published analyses where nonlinear modeling is crucial. .

Publication info

astro-ph/0608632, Phys. Rev. D, in press (36 PRD pages, 25 figures, 3 tables)
Download: pdf

LUMINOUS RED GALAXY PICS


Luminous Red Galaxies (red dots) provide six times more cosmological information than typical ones, because they can be seen further away and therefore map a large volume. Galaxies have their distance determined from their spectrum to create the 5 billion lightyears deep 3D map (right) where each galaxy is shown as a single point whose color represents its luminosity. This image shows only the small fraction of the galaxies in the map that lie near the plane of Earth's equator. (Click for high resolution jpg)
Same as previous figure, but showing only the upper slice. (Click for high resolution jpg)



The 3D power spectrum of galaxies from the SDSS

This packages up the large-scale clustering information from the 2004 SDSS data release 2 as a useful starting point for cosmological model fitting.
Figure 22: Our measured power spectrum of L* galaxies. The errors are uncorrelated except for an overall calibration uncertainty of order 4% not included in the error bars. The red curve is the best fit linear concordance model.

Click here to download the paper: (pdf, ps). The measurements and their window functions are further down on this page.

Authors:

Max Tegmark, Michael R. Blanton, Michael A. Strauss, Fiona S. Hoyle, David Schlegel, Roman Scoccimarro, Michael S. Vogeley, David H. Weinberg, Idit Zehavi, Andreas Berlind, Tamas Budavari, Andrew Connolly, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Douglas Finkbeiner, Joshua A. Frieman, James E. Gunn, Andrew J. S. Hamilton, Lam Hui, Bhuvnesh Jain, David Johnston, Stephen Kent, Huan Lin, Reiko Nakajima, Robert C. Nichol, Jeremiah P. Ostriker, Adrian Pope, Ryan Scranton, Uros Seljak, Ravi K. Sheth, Albert Stebbins, Alexander S. Szalay, Istvan Szapudi, Licia Verde, Yongzhong Xu, James Annis, Neta A. Bahcall, J. Brinkmann, Istvan Csabai, Jon Loveday, Mamoru Doi, Masataka Fukugita, Richard Gott III, Greg Hennessy, David Hogg, Zeljko Ivezic, Gillian R. Knapp, Don Q. Lamb, Brian C. Lee, Robert H. Lupton. Timothy A. McKay. Peter Kunszt. Jeffrey A. Munn. Liam O'Connell, John Peoples, Jeffrey R. Pier, Michael Richmond, Constance Rockosi, Christopher Stoughton, Douglas L. Tucker, Brian Yanny and Donald G. York, for the SDSS Collaboration

Abstract:

We measure the large-scale real-space power spectrum P(k) using a sample of 205,443 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, covering 2417 effective square degrees with mean redshift z~0.1. We employ a matrix-based method using pseudo-Karhunen-Loeve eigenmodes, producing uncorrelated minimum-variance measurements in 22 k-bands of both the clustering power and its anisotropy due to redshift-space distortions, with narrow and well-behaved window functions in the range 0.02h/Mpc < k < 0.3h/Mpc. We pay particular attention to modeling, quantifying and correcting for potential systematic errors, nonlinear redshift distortions and the artificial red-tilt caused by luminosity-dependent bias. Our results are robust to omitting angular and radial density fluctuations and are consistent between different parts of the sky. Our final result is a measurement of the real-space matter power spectrum P(k) up to an unknown overall multiplicative bias factor. Our calculations suggest that this bias factor is independent of scale to better than a few percent for k < 0.1h/Mpc, thereby making our results useful for precision measurements of cosmological parameters in conjunction with data from other experiments such as the WMAP satellite. The power spectrum is not well-characterized by a single power law, but unambiguously shows curvature. As a simple characterization of the data, our measurements are well fit by a flat scale-invariant adiabatic cosmological model with h Omega_m = 0.213 +/- 0.023 and sigma_8 = 0.89 +/- 0.02 for L* galaxies, when fixing the baryon fraction Omega_b/Omega_m=0.17 and the Hubble parameter h=0.72; cosmological interpretation is given in a companion paper.

Publication info

astro-ph/0310725, submitted to ApJ 6/18/03, report received 9/21/03, resubmitted 10/27/03, accepted 12/4/03 (41 ApJ pages, 40 figures, 3 tables)
Download: pdf, ps

Downloadable P(k) data

  1. Measurements and error bars from Table 3 in the paper: sdss_measurements.txt
  2. Window functions: sdss_windows.txt
  3. k-bands at which window functions are defined: sdss_kbands.txt
  4. Sample f77 code that computes SDSS likelihood given some P(k) model: compute_sdss_likelihood.f, sdss_likelihood_common.f
  5. All of the above combined into a single gzipped tar file: tarball.tar.gz
We recommend that you cut at kmax or 0.15h/Mpc (using 17 bands) or 0.20h/Mpc (using 19 bands) and fit to a nonlinear P(k) model.

Cosmological parameters from SDSS and WMAP

This is the companion paper to the "here's a measurement" paper above, discussing what it means.
Figure 10: Constraints on inflation models at 95% confidence. The phi^4 model (star) and the phi^2 model (a.k.a. eternal stochastic inflation; line segment) are seen to be emminently testable.

Click here to download the paper: (pdf, ps).

Authors:

Max Tegmark, Michael Strauss, Michael R. Blanton, Kev Abazajian, Scott Dodelson, Havard Sandvik, Xiaomin Wang, David H. Weinberg, Idit Zehavi, Neta A. Bahcall, Fiona Hoyle, David Schlegel, Roman Scoccimarro, Michael S. Vogeley, Andreas Berlind, Tamas Budavari, Andrew Connolly Daniel J. Eisenstein, Douglas Finkbeiner, Joshua A. Frieman, James E. Gunn, Lam Hui, Bhuvnesh Jain, David Johnston, Stephen Kent, Huan Lin, Reiko Nakajima, Robert C. Nichol, Jeremiah P. Ostriker, Adrian Pope, Ryan Scranton, Uros Seljak, Ravi K. Sheth, Albert Stebbins, Alexander S. Szalay, Istvan Szapudi, Yongzhong Xu, James Annis, J. Brinkmann, Scott Burles, Francisco J. Castander, Istvan Csabai, Jon Loveday, Mamoru Doi, Masataka Fukugita, Greg Hennessy, David W. Hogg, Zeljko Ivezic, Gillian R. Knapp, Don Q. Lamb, Brian C. Lee, Robert H. Lupton, Timothy A. McKay, Peter Kunszt, Jeffrey A. Munn, Liam O'Connell, John Peoples, Jeffrey R. Pier, Michael Richmond, Constance Rockosi, Donald P. Schneider, Christopher Stoughton, Douglas L. Tucker, Daniel E. Vanden Berk, Brian Yanny and Donald G. York

Abstract:

We measure cosmological parameters using the three-dimensional power spectrum P(k) from over 200,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in combination with WMAP and other data. Our results are consistent with a ``vanilla'' flat adiabatic Lambda-CDM model without tilt (n=1), running tilt, tensor modes or massive neutrinos. Adding SDSS information more than halves the WMAP-only error bars on some parameters, tightening 1 sigma constraints on the Hubble parameter from h~0.74+0.18-0.07 to h~0.70+0.04-0.03, on the matter density from Omega_m~0.25+/-0.10 to Omega_m~0.30+/-0.04 (1 sigma) and on neutrino masses from <11 eV to <0.6 eV (95%). SDSS helps even more when dropping prior assumptions about curvature, neutrinos, tensor modes and the equation of state. Our results are in substantial agreement with the joint analysis of WMAP and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, which is an impressive consistency check with independent redshift survey data and analysis techniques. In this paper, we place particular emphasis on clarifying the physical origin of the constraints, i.e., what we do and do not know when using different data sets and prior assumptions. For instance, dropping the assumption that space is perfectly flat, the WMAP-only constraint on the measured age of the Universe tightens from t0~16.3+2.3-1.8 Gyr to t0~14.1+1.0-0.9 Gyr by adding SDSS and SN Ia data. Including tensors, running tilt, neutrino mass and equation of state in the list of free parameters, many constraints are still quite weak, but future cosmological measurements from SDSS and other sources should allow these to be substantially tightened.

Publication info

astro-ph/0310723, submitted to Physical Review D (26 PRD pages, 18 figures, 8 tables) 10/27/03.
Download: pdf, ps

POWER SPECTRUM PICS


(This was astronomy picture of the day October 28 2003.) The SDSS is two separate surveys in one: galaxies are identified in 2D images (right), then have their distance determined from their spectrum to create a 2 billion lightyears deep 3D map (left) where each galaxy is shown as a single point, the color representing the luminosity - this shows only those 66,976 our of 205,443 galaxies in the map that lie near the plane of Earth's equator. (Click for high resolution jpg, version without lines.)



The new SDSS results (black dots) are the most accurate measurements to date of how the density of the Universe fluctuates from place to place on scales of millions of lightyears. These and other cosmological measurements agree with the theoretical prediction (blue curve) for a Universe composed of 5% atoms, 25% dark matter and 70% dark energy. The larger the scales we average over, the more uniform the Universe appears. (Click for high resolution jpg, no frills version.)

Slides for a talk?

Here's a tarball with gif images of all the figures in the 2003 SDSS+WMAP paper. If you type "xv *.gif" after unpacking it, hitting "[TAB]" will overlay the constraints one by one. Here's a powerpoint file with the highlights from in the SDSS+WMAP paper. Here's a tarball with gif images of the figures in the P(k) paper.

SDSS in the news

Here is a 2006 article about our SDSS power spectrum work in Sky & Telescope.
Here are some popular articles from 2003 that covered our SDSS power spectrum work in
Astronomy picture of the day, Science, Sky & Telescope, Science News, New Scientist, Japanese 1, Japanese 2, Japanese 3, Japanese 4, Dutch and Science Magazine's Breakthrough of the Year 2003.

The Angular Power Spectrum of Galaxies from Early SDSS Data

This angular power spectrum, packages up the large-scale clustering information from the SDSS early data release as a useful starting point for cosmological model fitting. It's one of a suite of five simultaneous papers: Scranton et al, Connolly et al, Tegmark et al, Szalay et al & Dodelson et al.
Figure 2: Uncorrelated measurements of the angular power spectrum for four magnitude bins. The curves show a standard ``concordance'' model with (solid) and without (dashed) nonlinear evolution using four separate bias factors of order unity as.

Please click here to download the paper. The measurements and their window functions are further down on this page.

Authors:

Max Tegmark, Scott Dodelson, Daniel Eisenstein, Vijay Narayanan, Roman Scoccimarro, Ryan Scranton, Michael A. Strauss, et al. (41 more)

Abstract:

We compute the angular power spectrum C_l from 1.5 million galaxies in early SDSS data on large angular scales, l<600. The data set covers about 160 square degrees, with a characteristic depth of order 1 Gpc/h in the faintest (21 < r' < 22) of our four magnitude bins. Cosmological interpretations of these results are presented in a companion paper by Dodelson et al (2001). The data in all four magnitude bins are consistent with a simple flat ``concordance'' model with nonlinear evolution and linear bias factors of order unity. Nonlinear evolution is particularly evident for the brightest galaxies. A series of tests suggest that systematic errors related to seeing, reddening, etc., are negligible, which bodes well for the sixtyfold larger sample that the SDSS is currently collecting. Uncorrelated error bars and well-behaved window functions make our measurements a convenient starting point for cosmological model fitting.
Figure 7: The same band power measurements as in Figure 2 above, but plotted in k-space assuming a radial selection function. The solid curve is a ``concordance'' model with (solid) and without (dashed) nonlinear evolution. Mean depth misestimates would shift the points along the dotted lines of slope -3.

Publication

astro-ph/0107418, ApJ, 571, 191

Downloadable C_l data

  1. C_l measurements and error bars from Table 1 in the paper for magnitude bins 18-19, 19-20, 20-21 & 21-22
  2. l-space window functions from Figure 3 in the paper for magnitude bins 18-19, 19-20, 20-21 & 21-22
  3. k-space window functions from Figure 5 in the paper for magnitude bins 18-19, 19-20, 20-21 & 21-22
  4. A readme file describing the contents of the files and their relation to the notation in the paper
  5. All of the above stuff in a single gzipped tar file
1 and 2 are measured from the data alone - see Scranton et al (2001), astro-ph/0107416 for a systematic error budget. 3 assumes the radial selection functions of Dodelson et al, astro-ph/0107421. The error bars are uncorrelated, so no the covariance matrix is simply the diagonal matrix with the above variances on the diagonal. Note that 1 + 3 combined is all you need to generate figure 7 above and to do your own fits cosmological models that predict P(k).

Other SDSS-related papers I've been involved with

  1. Detection of the Baryon Acoustic Peak in the Large-Scale Correlation Function of SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies, D. J. Eisenstein, I. Zehavi, D. W. Hogg, R. Scoccimarro, M. R. Blanton, R. C. Nichol, R. Scranton, H. Seo, M. Tegmark, Z. Zheng, S. Anderson, J. Annis, N. Bahcall, J. Brinkmann, S. Burles, F. J. Castander, A. Connolly, I. Csabai, M. Doi, M. Fukugita, J. A. Frieman, K. Glazebrook, J. E. Gunn, J. S. Hendry, G. Hennessy, Z. Ivezic, S. Kent, G. R. Knapp, H. Lin, Y. Loh, R. H. Lupton, B. Margon, T. McKay, A. Meiksin, J. A. Munn, A. Pope, M. Richmond, D. Schlegel, D. Schneider, K. Shimasaku, C. Stoughton, M. Strauss, M. SubbaRao, A. S. Szalay, I. Szapudi, D. Tucker, B. Yanny & D. York 2005, astro-ph/0501171, ApJ
  2. The Intermediate-Scale Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies, Idit Zehavi, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Robert C. Nichol, Michael R. Blanton, David W. Hogg, Jon Brinkmann, Jon Loveday, Avery Meiksin, Donald P. Schneider, Max Tegmark 2004, astro-ph/0411557, ApJ, 621, 22
  3. The Third Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, K. Abazajian et al. (SDSS collaboration; I'm one of 154 alphabetized authors) 2005, astro-ph/0410239, Astron. J, 129, 1755
  4. NYU-VAGC: a galaxy catalog based on new public surveys, Michael R. Blanton, David J. Schlegel, Michael A. Strauss, J. Brinkmann, Douglas Finkbeiner, Masataka Fukugita, James E. Gunn, David W. Hogg, Zeljko Ivezic, G. R. Knapp, Robert H. Lupton, Jeffrey A. Munn, Donald P. Schneider, Max Tegmark \& Idit Zehavi 2004, astro-ph/0410166, Astron. J, 129, 2562
  5. The Luminosity and Color Dependence of the Galaxy Correlation Function, I Zehavi, Z Zheng, DH Weinberg, JA Frieman, AA Berlind, MR Blanton, R Scoccimarro, RK Sheth, MA Strauss, I Kayo, Y Suto, M Fukugita, O Nakamura, NA Bahcall, J Brinkmann, JE Gunn, GS Hennessy, Z Ivezic, GR Knapp, J Loveday, A Meiksin, DJ Schlegel, DP Schneider, I Szapudi, M Tegmark, MS Vogeley & DG York 2004, astro-ph/0408569
  6. Cosmology and the Halo Occupation Distribution from Small-Scale Galaxy Clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Kevork Abazajian, Zheng Zheng, Idit Zehavi, David H. Weinberg, Joshua A. Frieman, Andreas A. Berlind, Michael R. Blanton, Neta A. Bahcall, J. Brinkmann, Donald P. Schneider & Max Tegmark 2005, astro-ph/0408003, ApJ, 625, 613
  7. Cosmological parameter analysis including SDSS Ly-alpha forest and galaxy bias: constraints on the primordial spectrum of fluctuations, neutrino mass, and dark energy, U Seljak, A Makarov, P McDonald, S Anderson, N Bahcall, J Brinkmann, S Burles, R Cen, M Doi, J Gunn, Z Ivezic, S Kent, R Lupton, J Munn, R Nichol, J Ostriker, D Schlegel, M Tegmark, D Van den Berk, D Weinberg & D York 2005, astro-ph/0407372, PRD, 71, 103515
  8. SDSS galaxy bias from halo mass-bias relation and its cosmological implications, U Seljak, A Makarov, R Mandelbaum, C Hirata, N Padmanabhan, P McDonald, M Blanton, M Tegmark, N Bahcall & J Brinkmann 2005, astro-ph/0406594, PRD, 71, 043511
  9. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data: Orion, Douglas Finkbeiner et al 2004, Astron. J., in press
  10. The Second Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Kev Abazajian et al 2004 (144 authors :), astro-ph/0403325, Astron. J., 128, 502
  11. Cosmological Parameters from Eigenmode Analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Galaxy Redshifts, A. Pope et al 2004, astro-ph/0401249, ApJ, 607, 655-660
  12. A Map of the Universe, J. Richard Gott III, Mario Juric, David Schlegel, Fiona Hoyle, Michael Vogeley, Max Tegmark, Neta Bahcall, Jon Brinkmann 2005, astro-ph/0310571, ApJ, 624, 463
  13. Physical evidence for dark energy, R. Scranton, A. J. Connolly, R. C. Nichol, A. Stebbins, I. Szapudi, D. J. Eisenstein, N. Afshordi, T. Budavari, I. Csabai, J. A. Frieman, J. E. Gunn, D. Johnson, Y. Loh, R. H. Lupton, C. J. Miller, E. S. Sheldon, R. S. Sheth, A. S. Szalay, M. Tegmark, Y. Xu, et al 2003, astro-ph/0307335
  14. A scheme to deal accurately and efficiently with complex angular masks in galaxy surveys, Andrew J. S. Hamilton & Max Tegmark 2003, astro-ph/0306324, MNRAS, 349, 115
  15. Angular Clustering with Photometric Redshifts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Bimodality in the Clustering Properties of Galaxies, Tamas Budavari, Andrew J. Connolly, Alexander S. Szalay, Istvan Szapudi, Istvan Csabai, Ryan Scranton, Neta A. Bahcall, Jon Brinkmann, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Joshua A. Frieman, Masataka Fukugita, James E. Gunn, David Johnston, Stephen Kent, Jon N. Loveday, Robert H. Lupton, Max Tegmark, Aniruddha R. Thakar, Brian Yanny, Donald G. York, Idit Zehavi 2003, astro-ph/0305603, ApJ, 595, 59
  16. The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Kev Abazajian et al 2003 (I'm out of 162nd out of 189 alphabetized authors :), astro-ph/0305492, Astron. J., 126, 2081
  17. On Departures From a Power Law in the Galaxy Correlation Function, Idit Zehavi, David H. Weinberg, Zheng Zheng, Andreas A. Berlind, Joshua A. Frieman, Roman Scoccimarro, Ravi K. Sheth, Michael R. Blanton, Max Tegmark, Houjun J. Mo, et al. 2004, astro-ph/0301280, ApJ, 608, 16
  18. The Galaxy Luminosity Function and Luminosity Density at Redshift z=0.1
    Michael R. Blanton, David W. Hogg, J. Brinkmann, Andrew J. Connolly, Istvan Csabai, Neta A. Bahcall, Masataka Fukugita, Jon Loveday, Avery Meiksin, Jeffrey A. Munn, R. C. Nichol, Sadanori Okamura, Thomas Quinn, Donald P. Schneider, Kazuhiro Shimasaku, Michael A. Strauss, Max Tegmark, Michael S. Vogeley & David H. Weinberg 2003, astro-ph/0210215, ApJ, 592, 819
  19. Two-Dimensional Topology of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey
    Fiona Hoyle, Michael S. Vogeley, J. Richard Gott III, Michael Blanton, Max Tegmark, David H. Weinberg, J. Brinkmann, N. Bahcall 2002, astro-ph/0206146, ApJ, 580, 663-671
  20. The 3D power spectrum from angular clustering of galaxies in early SDSS data
    Scott Dodelson, Vijay K. Narayanan, Max Tegmark, Ryan Scranton et al (42 others) 2002, astro-ph/0107421, ApJ, 572, 140
  21. KL estimation of the power spectrum parameters from the angular distribution of galaxies in early SDSS data
    Alexander Szalay, Bhuvnesh Jain, Takahiko Matsubara, Ryan Scranton, Michael S. Vogeley, et al (I'm 26 out of 49) 2003, astro-ph/0107419, ApJ, 591, 1
  22. The angular power spectrum of galaxies from early SDSS data
    Max Tegmark, Scott Dodelson, Daniel Eisenstein, Vijay Narayanan, Roman Scoccimarro, Ryan Scranton, Michael Strauss et al (41 others) 2002, astro-ph/0107418, ApJ, 571, 191
  23. The angular correlation function of galaxies from early SDSS data
    Andrew Connolly, Ryan Scranton, David Johnston et al (I'm 21 out of 49) 2002, astro-ph/0107417, ApJ, 579
  24. Analysis of systematic effects and statistical uncertainties in angular clustering of galaxies from early SDSS data
    Ryan Scranton, David Johnston, Scott Dodelson, Joshua Frieman et al (I'm 21 out of 47 :-) 2002, astro-ph/0107416, ApJ, 579, 48
  25. Galaxy clustering in early SDSS redshift data
    Idit Zehavi, Michael Blanton, Joshua Frieman, David Weinberg, Houjun Mo, Michael Strauss + 60 alphabetized authors (I'm the 53rd...:-) 2002, astro-ph/0102476, ApJ, 571, 172
  26. The time-evolution of bias and Bias and beyond
    M Tegmark & P J E Peebles,  ApJL, 500, 79-82 and a 2nd paper astro-ph/9809185
    Shows how SDSS can produce more realistic and robust matter power  spectra including stochastic bias
  27. Cosmic Complementarity: Joint Parameter Estimation from CMB Experiments and Redshift Surveys
    D J Eisenstein,W Hu & M Tegmark 1998, astro-ph/9807130, ApJ, 518, 2-23
    Detailed forecast of the accuracy with which SDSS + CMB can measure cosmological parameters
  28. Observationally Determining the Properties of Dark Matter
    W Hu, D J Eisenstein, M Tegmark & M White 1998, astro-ph/9806362, Phys. Rev. D, 59, 023512
    Shows how SDSS + CMB can constrain the equation of state and other properties of the dark matter
  29. Cosmic complementarity: H_0 and Omega_m from combining CMB experiments and redshift surveys
    D J Eisenstein,W Hu & M Tegmark 1998, astro-ph/9805239, ApJL, 504, L57
    Shows how SDSS + CMB can give an accurate and robust measurement of the Hubble constant
  30. Cosmic complementarity: probing the acceleration of the Universe
    M Tegmark, D J Eisenstein,W Hu & R Kron 1998, astro-ph/9805117, rejected by ApJL
    Shows how SDSS galaxy luminosities, sizes and counts can complement SN Ia and CMB for measuring Omega and Lambda
  31. Weighing neutrinos with galaxy surveys
    W Hu, D J Eisenstein & M Tegmark 1998, Phys. Rev. Lett., 80, 5255
    Shows that SDSS can provide interesting neutino mass limits
  32. Measuring the galaxy power spectrum with future redshift surveys
    M Tegmark, A Hamilton, M Strauss, M Vogeley & A Szalay 1998, ApJ, 499, 555-576
    Describes methods for computing the SDSS galaxy power spectrum and measuring cosmological parameters
  33. Measuring cosmological parameters with galaxy surveys
    M Tegmark 1997, Phys. Rev. Lett., 79, 3806
    Forecasts the accuracy with which SDSS can measure cosmological parameters

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Last modified: October 30, 2006